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bahey

The summer house of my soul
~ Tuesday, March 25 ~
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The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, is home to an extensive collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities. It has 120,000 items. It houses the world’s largest collection of Pharaonic antiquities, and many treasures of King Tutankhamen. The Egyptian government established the 1st museum, built in 1835 near the Ezbekeyah Garden and later to the Cairo Citadel. In 1855 Archduke Maximilian of Austria was given all of the artifacts by the Egyptian government; these are now in the Kunsthistorisches_Museum, Vienna.

A new museum was established at Boulaq in 1858 in a former warehouse, the building lay on the bank of the Nile River, and in 1878 it suffered significant damage in a flood of the Nile River. In 1892, the collections were moved to a former royal palace, in the Giza district of Cairo. They remained there until 1902 when they were moved, for the last time, to the current museum in Tahrir Square.

During the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, the museum was broken into, and two mummies were reportedly destroyed. Several artifacts were also shown to have been damaged. Around 50 objects were lost. Since then 25 objects have been found. Those that were restored were put on display in September 2013 in an exhibition entitled Damaged and Restored. (at The Egyptian Museum)

The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, is home to an extensive collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities. It has 120,000 items. It houses the world’s largest collection of Pharaonic antiquities, and many treasures of King Tutankhamen. The Egyptian government established the 1st museum, built in 1835 near the Ezbekeyah Garden and later to the Cairo Citadel. In 1855 Archduke Maximilian of Austria was given all of the artifacts by the Egyptian government; these are now in the Kunsthistorisches_Museum, Vienna.

A new museum was established at Boulaq in 1858 in a former warehouse, the building lay on the bank of the Nile River, and in 1878 it suffered significant damage in a flood of the Nile River. In 1892, the collections were moved to a former royal palace, in the Giza district of Cairo. They remained there until 1902 when they were moved, for the last time, to the current museum in Tahrir Square.

During the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, the museum was broken into, and two mummies were reportedly destroyed. Several artifacts were also shown to have been damaged. Around 50 objects were lost. Since then 25 objects have been found. Those that were restored were put on display in September 2013 in an exhibition entitled Damaged and Restored. (at The Egyptian Museum)


~ Monday, March 24 ~
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One of four stone lions flanking the east and west entrances of Qasr al-Nil Bridge (two at each side), they are late 19th century works by Henri Alfred Jacquemart; French sculptor and animalier. The bridge was originally named Khedive Ismail Bridge after King Fuad’s father, Khedive Isma’il Pasha. After the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, the name of the bridge, as well as other Egyptian buildings and bridges, were changed. This bridge was renamed Qasr al-Nil in Arabic, which translates as Palace of the Nile. The bridge was opened in June 1933; spans the Nile River in central Cairo. It connects downtown Cairo to Gezira Island and the Zamalek district. It has also witnessed a great number of marshes as well as a famous fight between the police & protestors during Jan 25th revolution as it leads directly to Tahrir square.   (at Qasr El Nile Bridge | كوبرى قصر النيل)

One of four stone lions flanking the east and west entrances of Qasr al-Nil Bridge (two at each side), they are late 19th century works by Henri Alfred Jacquemart; French sculptor and animalier. The bridge was originally named Khedive Ismail Bridge after King Fuad’s father, Khedive Isma’il Pasha. After the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, the name of the bridge, as well as other Egyptian buildings and bridges, were changed. This bridge was renamed Qasr al-Nil in Arabic, which translates as Palace of the Nile. The bridge was opened in June 1933; spans the Nile River in central Cairo. It connects downtown Cairo to Gezira Island and the Zamalek district. It has also witnessed a great number of marshes as well as a famous fight between the police & protestors during Jan 25th revolution as it leads directly to Tahrir square. (at Qasr El Nile Bridge | كوبرى قصر النيل)


~ Monday, November 4 ~
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(Source: ftyani)


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reblogged via eman-gamal
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The only way out, is up! (at El Moez St. | شارع المعز لدين الله الفاطمى)

The only way out, is up! (at El Moez St. | شارع المعز لدين الله الفاطمى)


~ Sunday, November 3 ~
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Al-Jam`e Al-Anwar, literally:The Enlightened Mosque) also Al-Hakim Mosque is a major Islamic religious site in Cairo, Egypt. It is named after Imam Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah (985–1021), the sixth Fatimid caliph,16 th Fatimid/Ismaili Imam and the first to be born in Egypt.

The mosque was originally built as an enclosure by the Fatimid vizier Gawhar Al-Siqilli (c. 928–992), but was incorporated into the extended fortifications built by Badr al-Jamali. It consists of an irregular rectangle with four arcades surrounding the courtyard. An unusual feature is the monumental entrance with its projecting stone porch. It is located in “Islamic Cairo”, on the east side of Muizz Street, just south of Bab Al-Futuh (the northern gate). (at Al Haakem Mosque)

Al-Jam`e Al-Anwar, literally:The Enlightened Mosque) also Al-Hakim Mosque is a major Islamic religious site in Cairo, Egypt. It is named after Imam Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah (985–1021), the sixth Fatimid caliph,16 th Fatimid/Ismaili Imam and the first to be born in Egypt.

The mosque was originally built as an enclosure by the Fatimid vizier Gawhar Al-Siqilli (c. 928–992), but was incorporated into the extended fortifications built by Badr al-Jamali. It consists of an irregular rectangle with four arcades surrounding the courtyard. An unusual feature is the monumental entrance with its projecting stone porch. It is located in “Islamic Cairo”, on the east side of Muizz Street, just south of Bab Al-Futuh (the northern gate). (at Al Haakem Mosque)


~ Saturday, September 28 ~
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Watching life of Pi in the strangest place and with the nicest company.   (at Zad AlMosafer Ecolodge)

Watching life of Pi in the strangest place and with the nicest company. (at Zad AlMosafer Ecolodge)


~ Monday, September 9 ~
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(Source: joeydeangelis)


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reblogged via koka1
~ Friday, August 30 ~
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grittykota:

madebyabvh:

Joker has a Bat-Craze

Original illustration by JOCK

O3O.


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reblogged via grittykota
~ Friday, July 12 ~
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  كيف تقاوم الانقلاب الغسكرى (by Egypt Anti-Coup)


~ Thursday, June 13 ~
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reblogged via anthonygrey